ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE
IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA DURING WWII
Adelaide - Gawler - Mallala - Mount Gambier -
Parafield - Port Pirie - Victor Harbor
by Peter Ingman

hline.gif (2424 bytes)

 

At the start of the Second World War there was no permanent RAAF presence in South Australia, but within just two years there were several facilities housing thousands of personnel and hundreds of aircraft. The bulk of this hurried expansion involved Empire Air Training Scheme facilities and saw some 23,000 South Australians serve locally with the RAAF.

New air bases were constructed at Port Pirie, Mallala and Mount Gambier while an elementary flying training school was run from Adelaide's existing airport at Parafield. Other large ground training facilities were established at Victor Harbor and in central Adelaide.

After Japan's entry into the war Avro Anson training aircraft were formed into reserve squadrons to protect South Australia's coasts. A 1942 scheme saw a ring of airfields planned for the defence of Adelaide itself. Ultimately, just one of these was completed, Gawler, and it became the only wartime South Australian airfield with a sealed runway. No. 86 Squadron, flying Kittyhawk fighters, and No. 21 Squadron, flying Vengeance dive-bombers, were both based there during 1943.

In the final two years of the war Parafield was busy as a centre for C-47 Dakota operations, housing both an Australian and a British transport squadron.

In 1945 the RAAF presence in South Australia ended as quickly as it began, and for this reason the story has been mostly forgotten. Some 147 members of the RAAF died in the state during the war and now the history surrounding their sacrifice can be told.

Soft cover, 297 mm x 210 mm

Many B & W photos

96 pages, 3 Appendices

Two page name index

 

Buy your copy here

 


 

"Australia @ War" WWII Research Products

I need your help

Copyright

 Peter Dunn OAM 2020

Disclaimer

Please e-mail me
any information or photographs


"Australia @ War"
USB Memory Stick

This page first produced 26 February 2021

This page last updated 26 February 2021